Why PR is bad PR for PR

Two weeks ago, at a lunch with senior PR people in Singapore, the conversation drifted to how to make senior executives in corporations understand what PR people can do for them.

The conversation went on a predictable course: lamentation of how difficult it is to explain to others what PR people do, let alone what they are capable of doing. There was the self congratulatory we-do-so-many-things idea, the we-are-so-inexpensive-compared to-others idea and the usual other cliches.

But they all agreed that it is soooo difficult to explain what PR does.

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UBS all hog-tied in China

This is an interesting case for crisis management aficionados.

We live in interesting times indeed when hypersensitivity meets the mob mentality on social media.

UBS Chief Economist Paul Donovan was commenting in his podcast on China’s economy and how there’s been some inflation caused by sick pigs in China. The country has recently had to cull 1.1 million pigs because of an outbreak of swine fever.

He tried to add a bit of color to his commentary instead of dishing out the usual cut-and-dried tone of economists: “Does this matter?” he asked. “It matters if you are a Chinese pig. It matters if you like eating pork in China.”

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AMEC Summit 2018: Integrated Communications and Measure Beyond Output

Photo credit: AMEC

Maverick’s commitment to taking measurement seriously in our communications planning involved sending Partner Ong Hock Chuan and Director Monitoring & Analytics Felicia Nugroho to the AMEC Summit in Barcelona from June 12 – 14. Here are their take away from the summit.

It is certainly not business as usual for media monitoring services.

More print publications are closing down by the day, readers have switched to either reading the news online, on digital platforms or relying on links shared on their chat applications such as WhatsApp.

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Public Relations lessons from Bell Pottinger collapse

As a young man cutting my teeth in journalism during the Thatcher years, I was in awe of the people behind the company, Bell Pottinger, that helped ensure her electoral victories. I remember they were touted as one of the first public relations firms to use behavioral psychology to good effect.

Now, after being in Public Relations for about 18 years and seeing the Bell Pottinger name reappear into prominence,and with it the man who founded the firm, I must say that it is a letdown. The man at the helm of that once powerful public relations firm turns out to be a doddering shadow of his former image in the interview below:

He was combative and defensive, he was in denial and he could not even switch off his mobile for an interview- twice.

What lessons can we PR people learn from this? Read More